Greeting Customs

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Matrix4b
Greeting Customs

It has been asked on a Facebook group discussion if it is a custom to shake hands or salute in Shaintar.

Most customs would probably be the same.  Why Re-Invent too much of the Wheel?

To Copy some of it:

Betty Law MorganSince handshakes originated as a gesture of peace between armed warriors (that's why it's the right hand, you can't draw your sword with your dominant hand if you're using it to shake and most people are right handed), I have to assume some variant exists. Might be a wrist or forearm clasp. but something similar.

Howard BrandonIt would be the forearm clasp as that reveals that you have no hidden blades.Betty Law MorganZerin is notorious for being able to produce a blade from out of nowhere and make it disappear just as easily. He's practices sleight of hand for just suchRuben RiveraProducing a character who has crafted plenty of means of poisons, a handshake might be a stalled assassination. Interesting topic

Howard BrandonHence why lords do not shake hands with those they don't know. Also, why there are food tasters, etc...

David ForbyMany Asian cultures, most notibly in Japan, have the custom of bowing. Which says many things. I would think that Bowing is a custom among Dregordians or other races with claws that have feral roots. From the link below: “You are stronger than me. You are a threat to me. Therefore I bow down into a position I would be in if you defeated me in a fight. I am defeated already, so there is no need for you to attack.”

http://www.saywhydoi.com/history-of-the-bow-why-do-we-bow/

 

So, I can see a variation of cultural Greetings:

Humans: Handshake in the form of a forearm clasp.  In the Desert Lands See the Eldakar/Avakar forms.

Brinchie and Dregordian: Bow.  The Dregordians may have some complicated ettiquite as Japan or other cultures that have it.  Brinchie not so much.

Aevakar:  Hmm, tough one, Shake hands or per hapse a wing flare/twitch.  Too little of them to really have a culture.

Eldakar and Avakar:  I would think that they have a bow system that would be closer to an arabian feel than the Japanese feel.

Goblinesh:  Hmm, I would think that they would be less formal.  Perhaps a Handclasp firmly with a pump or a pat on the back.  I can see a overjoyed expression being the picking up of the other person.  Or even the russian custom of kissing or "Air Kissing" both cheeks.

Korindian:  This in my mind would be more the bow type system but with less feral conotations but a mutual sign of respect and one person yeilding to the other.  Student to Master, Young to Elder, Young to Adult, and so forth.  Much like the Japanese it would be length, timing, and depth of bow.

Free Lands: I can see this varying but would be a sort of expression of Freedom much like the forearm clasp of humans.

 

This is all I can think of off the top of my head.  Any ideas?

David Forby

Capnsmitty19
Capnsmitty19's picture

Maybe I am imagining it, but I always thougt that the forearm clasp was between warriors to judge their opponents forearm strength.  I dunno, all seem very plausible.  

 I play an Aevakar, how I always introduce my self is with a head bow and ploom of the wings.  When I am trying to be intimidating/taunting ill let the wings do a bit of a ruffle.

 

Steven C
Steven C's picture

While bowing is way of showing one is superior I don't see it as a Dregordians thing. For them I see it as kneeling, with the etiquette of the situtation determining whether it is a one or two knee kneel or even a full both hands/feet/head on the ground. Also for them showing one's throat, to me, would be the clearer sign of showing an authority figure that they are the dominant or alpha of a group. Actually I'd see the Brinchie showing the throat as well as a sign of submission to the stronger. 

IMO, having the superior place one hand on the 'vassal's' neck could be a sign of acceptance (as we use the idea of accepting the handshake). This would be symbolic of the superior taking the vassal's life in their hands. Both races are clawed and having a sharp set of claws are your throat would, to me, be the ulimate sign of showing acceptance on both sides.

Even further into this perhaps Dregordian vassal's always walk one step behind and to the right of their lords, with exceptions of bodyguards who are normally to the left. The postion of the bodyguard in relation to the lord is a sign of the lords 'comfort' level with the area/people around them. If the bodyguard is a step in front it is a sign that the guard is actively defending his lord and the lord sees a situation of trouble while a step behind the guard is passive and while still being a bodyguard the lord sees the area/people with trust.

Being that Dregordians need not simply be physically protected but also mentally protected (the Beast can be a Bitch) it means that the 'host' of the situation would have more of a heavy duty. Dregordians, I think, would develop a culture (like many real world ones) where it is considered the host's previlige and duty to completely see to the comfort of the guest, the idea is that it is a failing on the host if something is missed. Dregordians as host, in this situation, tend to be meticulous in planning events and seeing to all facets of a guests comfort.

Protection guests is another thing related to the above paragraph. Dregordians see it as the hosts duty to protect the guests so if the guest is injured or killed it is a blight on the host. As a political tool inside the nation I'd see rivals waiting to kill each other at certain places to 'kill two birds with one stone' so to speak. Killing a rival and shaming another rival for failing as a host to protect them.

One thing however I do not see either the Dregordian or the Brinchie doing is the handshake, forearm clasp, etc.. because of the claws (gestures of peace are harder if your using a weapon). As 'clawed' races the handshake could also be considered a faux pas to them. Certain Dregordians and Brinchie could use this as a test of other races to see if they understand even the smallest amount of their culture and traditions. A test given without a word spoken and even before an introduction,

Sooz - RF
Sooz - RF's picture

For the aevakar, I'd say they'd have customs according to individual aeyries, especially for the more northern aeyries, where there wouldn't be a lot of social interaction with outsiders.  

 

Murvoth
Murvoth's picture

Given the Eastern European customs for the Goblinesh I do know typically In Russia, the typical greeting is a very firm handshake. Assume you’re trying to crush each others knuckles, all the while maintaining direct eye contact. When men shake hands with women, the handshake is less industrial. It is considered gallant to kiss women three times while alternating cheeks, and even to kiss hands. While what I know of Hungarians,  it involves utilizing the friendly greeting form of kissing each other on the cheeks. The most common way is to kiss from your right to your left. When men meet for the first time, the casual norm is a firm handshake. Perhaps this is signified in the traditional northern gathers where a combination of this with say the Southern nations was developed, though less formal tends to be the overall opinion for their race.

 

johnmkimmins

I could see lands of the south having the custom of saluting as you approach near a camp, raising your right hand straight above you and the left hand held open - palm fowards. If you're carrying a large weapon without a carrying strap or scabbard it is held horizontally in the right hand or if space is an issue with the dangerous end pointing down. 

johnmkimmins

In the Last Call tradition it might also be customary for Olarans to tip a portion of their drink onto the ground if they raise a glass/mug in toast, or perhaps when greeting a friend when you have a drink in hand.

johnmkimmins

Steven C wrote:

One thing however I do not see either the Dregordian or the Brinchie doing is the handshake, forearm clasp, etc.. because of the claws (gestures of peace are harder if your using a weapon). As 'clawed' races the handshake could also be considered a faux pas to them. Certain Dregordians and Brinchie could use this as a test of other races to see if they understand even the smallest amount of their culture and traditions. A test given without a word spoken and even before an introduction,

They might fist bump ;-)

 

 

 

 

Steven C
Steven C's picture

Guess that opens it up for two Brinchie high on catnip to invent the exploding fist bump

howardrbrandon-RF
howardrbrandon-RF's picture

Steven C,

Hahaha

Howard R Brandon III

Community Manager

AKA Colonel Alexander Wolfhaven

Echer'Naught Regional Command HQ

DavidFredricksonJr.
DavidFredricksonJr.'s picture

agreed hahahahahaha

Est Sularus oth Mithas.